Tuesday, March 28th

We finished discussing chapters 5-6, noting the over stimulation of the senses, the satire of contemporary society, and the class’ postings on the homework site.  We then did a plickers quiz of chapters 7-8 and then we continued our competition and discussion of chapters 7-8.

Please post your favourite quotation from chapters 7-8 and comment on why you chose it.

Read chapters 9-10.  We will be writing in class on the novel on Thursday.

TERM THREE MISSING ASSIGNMENTS

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Published in: on March 28, 2017 at 10:33 pm  Comments (18)  

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  1. He had discovered Time and Death and God.

    “Alone, always alone,” the young man was saying.
    The words awoke a plaintive echo in Bernard’s mind. Alone, alone … “So am I,” he said, on a gush of confidingness. “Terribly alone.” (118)

    John explains his rough childhood on the reservation to Bernard. He is isolated as his peers do not want to initiate any conversations with him due to the fact that “[l]ots of men [come] to see Linda,” his mother. One day the Popé brings a book. “called The Complete Works of William Shakespeare. John reads it religiously enough to memorize lines by heart. His peers disincludes him from doing the Antelope Kiva, a ceremony that transitions young boys into men, driving him away. That night, feeling dejected, he attempts to self harm. Realizing his actions, he feels as if he could go on. This quotation drew my attention because John uses Shakespeare lines to express his emotions similarly to what the character in the play was feeling. The lines “To-morrow and to-morrow and to-morrow” is an literary allusion. It is used when Macbeth believes life is meaningless due to the death of his wife. Likewise, John feels empty and useless. It is also interesting because both John and Bernard share the same dilemma in being ‘alone’. The difference is that John feels left out from what the “World State has to offer” while Bernard, although being part of the world state, makes him an “outsider” due to his differences.

  2. Tomorrow and tomorrow and tomorrow . . .
    He had discovered Time and Death and God.
    “Alone, always alone,” the young man was saying.
    The words awoke a plaintive echo in Bernard’s mind. Alone, alone … “So am I,” he said, on a gush of confidingness. “Terribly alone.”

    John explains his rough childhood on the reservation to Bernard. He is isolated as his peers do not want to initiate any conversations with him due to the fact that “[l]ots of men [come] to see Linda,” his mother. One day the Popé brings a book. “called The Complete Works of William Shakespeare.” John reads it religiously enough to memorize lines by heart. His peers disincludes him from doing the Antelope Kiva, a ceremony that transitions young boys into men, driving him away. That night, feeling dejected, he attempts to self harm. Realizing his actions, he feels as if he could go on. This quotation drew my attention because John uses Shakespeare lines to express his emotions similarly to what the character in the play was feeling. The lines “To-morrow and to-morrow and to-morrow” is an literary allusion. It is used when Macbeth believes life is meaningless due to the death of his wife. Likewise, John feels empty and useless. It is also interesting because both John and Bernard share the same dilemma in being ‘alone’. The difference is that John feels left out from what the “World State has to offer” while Bernard, although being part of the world state, makes him an “outsider” due to his differences.

  3. “One day, when he came in from playing, the door of the inner room was open, and he saw them lying together on the bed, asleep—white Linda and Popé almost black beside her, with one arm under her shoulders and the other dark hand on her breast, and one of the plaits of his long hair lying across her throat, like a black snake trying to strangle her.” (42)

    John’s feeling that sex is dirty and violent begins here, in his childhood. He talks about the Popé’s relationship with his mother, and this is an example of the way imagery was used in literature to show emotion.

  4. “I hate walking. And you feel so small when you’re on the ground at the bottom of a hill.” (108)

    “When they were half-way up, and eagle flew past so close to them that the wind of this wings blew chill on their faces.” (108)

    Lenina in the savage reservation is no longer an upper caste member of society, but is now seen as an outcast and is at the bottom of savage society. The hill is a pathetic fallacy, representing the struggle that Lenina will have to endure in the reservation without all the technology like soma and helicopters that she had at home. The eagle is a metaphor for power and strength , and how Bernard and Lenina will be under rule by the higher castes of savage society.

  5. He held out his right hand in the moonlight. From the cut on his wrist the blood was still oozing. Every few seconds a drop fell, dark, almost colourless in the dead light. Drop, drop, drop. To-morrow and to-morrow and to-morrow …
    He had discovered Time and Death and God.

    John cries alone because he is isolated and lonely, looking at his wrist bleeding. Macbeth’s famous line, “tomorrow and tomorrow and tomorrow” is used here to describe that John feels hopeless and isolated just like Macbeth lost his life purpose after his wife’s death.

  6. -For the previous 2 posts, “shyepanda” was me

    “For instance,” she hoarsely whispered, “take the way they have one another here. Mad, I tell you, absolutely mad. Everybody belongs to every one else—don’t they? don’t they?” she insisted, tugging at Lenina’s sleeve. Lenina nodded her averted head, let out the breath she had been holding and managed to draw another one, relatively untainted. “Well, here,” the other went on, “nobody’s supposed to belong to more than one person. And if you have people in the ordinary way, the others think you’re wicked and anti-social. They hate and despise you. Once a lot of women came and made a scene because their men came to see me. Well, why not? And then they rushed at me… No, it was too awful. I can’t tell you about it.” (7.56)

    This quote is seen during chapter 7 when Linda tells Lenina about what sexuality is like in the Other Place. I chose this because it can be seen that those living in the World State can be caught off guard by something so foreign to them (the idea of monogamy). Linda is a woman who was thrown out of the World State, and has experienced both what she was conditioned to do in the World State and what it is like in the Other Place. She seems strangely at peace with her wrinkled, aged appearance when compared with Lenina’s “beta” face and body. Though the World State was supposed to be a utopia, the residents of the Other Place seem to be more content with how they live.

  7. “‘Alone, always alone,” the young man was saying. ‘So am I, terribly alone.’ Bernard said. ‘I thought that in the Other Place…I mean, Linda always said that nobody was ever alone there.’ said John. ‘You see, I’m rather different from most people, I suppose.’ Bernard said.” (118-119)

    In the Other Place, happiness can be bought and there are many ways to satisfy your daily needs. No one is jealous of another because they are just made that way, and there are rarely ever any problems in their world. But even if you try to achieve a perfect Utopic society, there are still a few problems that occur. John acknowledges that Bernards’s life is fun and carefree but what John did not know is that there are still to some extent of problems the artificial world cannot resolve. Like for example here, Bernard feels lonely even if he has everything. Hence, loneliness is a problem is the Other Place’s society. There is no connection between humans anymore. Humans don’t take responsibility anymore. So, in a way, the civilised and the savages both feel loneliness even though the civilised has and can have everything.

    (this is sam if my username weirdly changes again)

  8. My favourite quotation from chapter 7 and 8 is ” ‘But cleanliness is next to fordliness,’ she insisted. ‘Yes, and civilisation is sterilisation,’ Bernard went on, …” (chapter 7 page 110), because this conversation between Lenina and Bernard shows, how diffrent they both are. Lenina believes everything what the people are saying to her and she doesn’t do anything against the rules. Bernard, is the opposite of her. He doesn’t want to live in the normal way. He wants to be different. He also knows things, no one else knows and he wants to show Lenina all of those things.

  9. “Lenina liked the drums. Shutting her eyes she abandoned herself to their soft repeated thunder, allowed it to invade her consciousness more and more completely, till at last there was nothing left in the world but that one deep pulse of sound. It reminded her reassuringly of the synthetic noises made at Solidarity Services and Ford’s Day celebrations. “Orgy-porgy,” she whispered to herself. These drums beat out just the same rhythms.” (97)

    Lenina is listening to drums and slowly getting lost in the beat. She is going to her most comfortable place to her, a place she knows well like the Solidarity Service back where she was from. This reminds something I like to do, get lost in the music. Its the most relaxing place I know and a place I go to when I need it the most.

  10. “So they’re having children all the time – like dogs. It’s too revolting…And yet John was a great comfort to me.” (122)

    I like this quote because. Linda tries to explain the incomprehensible behavior of the savages, and this quote illustrates the power of the parental love for there child. I liked the fact that Huxley uses surprising
    emotions in some character to demonstrate that there are some aspects of being a human, that cant be controlled by the society or the government.

  11. “What a Wonderful intimate relationship he said deliberately outrageous and what an intensity of feeling it must Generate.

    Pg96

    I chose this quote because in this quote it said what an intensity feeling must Generate but in real life it doesn’t always work and in this book it works.

  12. The quote I chose is, “But cleanliness is next to fordliness,” (110) because in the whole story, we’ve noticed that instead of saying “oh God,” they say “oh Ford.” They almost use Ford for everything and this quotation is almost like it’s holy in their sense and how it’s a big deal to be clean because Henry Ford was clean. Almost like how people in the present look at God and how he’s clean.

  13. “When a child ask you how a helicopter work or who made the world- well, what are you to answer if you’re a Beta and have always worked in the Fertilizing Room. What are you to answer” (chapter 7, page 122)

    Linda expresses her emotion to Lenina after Jhon and Bernard leave. When Jhon was still a child, he asked Linda many questions. However, Linda could not answer him due to her lack of knowledge; which low key points out how unfair the education system is in their society. People weren’t allowed to educate themselves, yet its all planned out before birth. In my opinion, everyone should have the rights to educate themselves, instead of been a choice of others.

  14. “‘Hes old, that’s all,’ Bernard answered as carelessly as he could. He too was startled; but he made an effort to seem unmoved.
    ‘Old?’ she repeated. ‘But the Director’s old; lots of people are old; they’re not like that.’
    ‘That’s because we don’t allow them to be like that…'” (95)

    I chose this quote because it demonstrates that science has gone so far to “improve” humans that they have eliminated such a basic part of life. In chapter three, the Controller, Mustapha Mond mentioned that in the past, old men would retire, take to religion or spend their time reading and thinking. All these things threaten the order of their society. That could explain why they don’t let people get old.

    In their society, since people stay young, they are able to stay distracted by their work until they die. If they do have time to read or think though, they just take soma instead and they go back to work.

  15. “In the rank sweat of the enseamed bed, // Stew’d in corruption, honeying and making love // over the nasty sty” (113)
    It mentions corruption, corruption in the need for pleasure, to be constantly stimulated, to seek control over civilization as we see in this book with how they Bolanovskify and condition people. How disgusting it is that human beings don’t seek things that have a deeper value and that they do conform so often. It is a satire.

  16. My favourite quotation from Brave New World Chapters 7 and 8 is “But cleanliness is next to fordiness,” she insisted. “Yes, and civilization is sterilization. But these people have never heard of Our Ford, and they aren’t civilized” (Pg. 110).
    The people in Brave New World were taught that cleanliness is just about as important as fordiness.
    Sterilization means either two things in Brave New World: One is being sterilized to not be able to have offsprings and the other is civilization is cleanliness. The people who were different from others were considered uncivilized “dirty,” but Bernard responded with disgust by saying that by stating that, you are saying that you are the perfect being and others are not as good as you, which is basically just another form of racism.
    Like in the residential schools, where the aboriginal/first nationed people were forced from their families to go to the school. There, the children were forced to learn European culture, and could not learn their own.

  17. TIME’S UP FOR POSTING ON THESE CHAPTERS. THE DEADLINE WAS MIDNIGHT, MARCH 29TH, 2017.

  18. I feel ashamed that I did not hear the homework announcement, you don’t have to read this at all but I just want to say something I have already prepared.
    My favourite quote is “O brave new world that has such people in it. Let’s start at once.” Said by John on page 139. After Bernard discovers his similarity with John and the possibility of who his father might be, he invites John and Linda to go back to London with him. “O brave new world” is an allusion to Shakespeare’s Tenpest. This emphasizes John’s formal point of view and that he is well educated. This quote is also a dramatic irony between John and Bernard. John sees the “new world” as a place where he will find his happiness, however, it is also a place where Bernard is separated from society and is discriminated by the Director. As the title of the book, this quote foreshadows the negative outcome possibilities after John and Linda arrives in London, and a possible climax.


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